Working with Third-Party Recruiters

Working with Recruiters 2017-05-25T09:49:12+00:00

As you conduct your job search, you will find that some employers hire third-party organizations (known as recruiting, head-hunting, staffing or executive search firms) to assist them in identifying and hiring college students. An employer can hire a third-party organization to do on-campus recruiting, represent the company at a job fair, screen job candidates who apply through a website or other hiring activities. Embry-Riddle’s Career Services recommends that you be aware of issues that are pertinent to working with third party recruiters.

The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) defines third-party recruiters as “agencies, organizations or individuals recruiting candidates for temporary, part-time or full-time employment opportunities other than for their own needs.” They may be referred to as head hunters, executive search firms or staffing/sourcing agencies, among other terms.

The most common types of third-party recruiters include:

  • Employment agencies list positions for a number of organizations and receive payment when a referred candidate is hired. The fee for listing a position is paid either by the firm listing the opening or by the candidate who is hired. If the job listing does not include the phrase “fee paid,” be sure to ask who pays the fee before signing any papers.
  • A search firm contracts with employers to find and screen qualified persons to fill specific positions. The employer pays the fee.
  • Employers hire contract recruiters to represent them in the recruiting and employment function.
  • A resume referral firm collects information on job seekers and forwards it to prospective employers. You must give the firm written permission to pass your resume to employers. Your permission should include a statement that expressly states to whom and for what purpose the information can be used.

Questions to Ask

A third-party recruiter may be helpful to you in your job search, but be a wise consumer. Read all materials carefully. Ask questions. Ask your career services office staff for information. Ask a lawyer to read any contracts you are asked to sign. Here are some general questions you may want to ask:

  • How many job openings are there for someone in my field? If you have the opportunity, inquire about the positions being filled or the number of openings related to your field. These are important questions because, in some instances, recruiters may not really have the type or number of openings they advertise. They may be more interested in adding your name to their candidate pool as a means of attracting more employers or clients to their services. Or they may be collecting resumes from students for potential job opportunities.
  • How is this information being used? A third-party recruiter is allowed legally to share your resume with the contract employer for positions that you are actually seeking. The recruiter must tell you, in clear terms, that your materials and information will not be shared outside the organization or used for any purpose other than with the company they represent at the time they interview you. The third-party recruiter cannot sell your information to anyone else. You may choose to authorize the recruiter to share your data elsewhere, but your authorization should be given to the recruiter in writing.
  • Are candidates treated equally and fairly? If you are qualified for the job opportunity, the third-party recruiter must pass your information to employers without regard to your race, color, national origin, religion, age, gender, sexual orientation, or disability.
  • Who pays the fee? Before you agree to anything or sign a contract, ask the recruiter who will pay the fee.

Source: NACE

Third-Party Recruiters

Third-party recruiter links for military personnel planning to transition can be found on our Military to Civilian Career Transitioners resource page.

Disclaimer: Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University does not and will not endorse, condone or support either the companies seeking employees or any new job and surrounding activities for which employment is sought. The intended purpose of this service is to provide possible job opportunities for students and alumni and creates no warranty as to any listed company. Choosing a job is your decision; please use caution and common sense.